108 Fascinating Looks Into The Past From The “Historyfeels” Facebook Page

When was the last time you had a history lesson? Perhaps it was watching a documentary or listening to a podcast centered around prominent events in the past? Or maybe you recently visited a museum that taught you more about your own country or city’s history? Regardless of how much you know about the world’s past, the beautiful thing about history is that there is always more to be learned!

If you’re interested in some photos that will give you more insight into our planet and the fascinating people in it, you’ve come to the right place. Down below, we’ve gathered some of the most captivating posts from the “Historyfeels” Facebook page that might make you feel like you’ve been transported to another time and place.

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Be sure to upvote the photos that teach you something new, and feel free to share more historical fun facts you know in the comments section. Then, if you’re looking to continue your education, you can find a previous Bored Panda article featuring photos that belong in a history museum right here.

#1 Grover Krantz Was An Anthropologist Who Donated His Body To The Smithsonian Museum To Show How Skeletons Can Be Educational Tools

His only condition was that he wanted his beloved dog next to him even after death. The museum honored his request.

Image credits: Historyfeels

#2 When Both Sides Of The Eurotunnel First Met In 1990

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#3 On August 23, 1989, About 2 Million People From Latvia, Estonia And Lithuania Formed A Human Chain

It united all 3 countries to show the world their desire to escape the Soviet Union and communism.

Image credits: Historyfeels

Although history is only what’s in the past, it’s simultaneously never ending. We could study the history of one specific place for a lifetime and still not fully understand the richness of its story, as our lifetimes are only a small sliver of time compared to how long our world has existed. And while it’s impossible to know everything, it’s quite fascinating to learn as much as we possibly can. But we don’t all have time to dedicate to reading history books and visiting museums around the world on the regular. For some of us, even just learning little bits of history on Facebook is much better than nothing.

The Historyfeels Facebook page is so great because it is so accessible. A quick scroll through their feed can teach you a wide variety of historical fun facts, and you’re likely to remember these tidbits of information because they’re always paired with a captivating image. Historyfeels has amassed 143k followers since its launch and describes itself as a page dedicated to “posting the forgotten people, events and powerful moments of history”. We hope you enjoy your scroll through this list and that you too keep these snapshots from history from being forgotten.

#4 Teaching Each Other Their Respective Cultures

Image credits: Historyfeels

#5 Photos Of A Sixteen-Year Old German Anti-Aircraft Soldier During Ww2

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#6 Wedding Dress Made Out Of The Parachute That Saved Her Husband’s Life In Wwii

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One of the most important reasons to study history is because it always inevitably repeats itself. I’m sure your teachers in school told you this from a young age, and perhaps you rolled your eyes at the implication that you could prevent the next World War or that you were responsible for keeping democracy alive. But it is important that we all understand history and how our world became what it is today. According to MOOC.org, one of the main reasons we study history is to understand how it continues to impact us nowadays.

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“Take the Great Depression, for example—one of the most difficult but impactful periods in American history,” MOOC notes on their blog. “The economic crisis put almost 15 million people out of work and sent countless families into homelessness, stealing their sense of security. Many of those people would feel insecure for the rest of their lives. The government had to learn how to help. This effort gave rise to Social Security, federal emergency relief programs, and funding for unemployment efforts. These changes continue to make life more secure for millions of Americans. Society today comes from hundreds and thousands of actions like these. The more you learn about how these things happened, the better you understand real life.”

#7 The Arctic Ocean Photographed In The Same Place, 105 Years Ago vs. Today

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#8 A Child’s Carseat From 1950s

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#9 A Couple Of Victorian Travelers, 1890s

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MOOC also explains that history is not simply a study of others, it’s a study of us. We’re not so different from our ancestors, and by viewing them as “others”, we risk feeling like we’re immune from making the same mistakes they did. But as Spanish philosopher George Santayana once said, “Those who cannot remember the past are doomed to repeat it.” The people who came before us shaped our world, created the societies we live in and gave us the traditions we continue to uphold or decide to challenge today. Understanding history also allows us insight into why some societies thrive while others fail, why humans have gone to war so many times and how we have changed society for the better. Without taking time to analyze the past, we would never have innovation or make improvements.   

#10 Urban Planning Before Autocad

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#11 Indian Air Force Helicopter Unit 116

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#12 Woman Taking A Selfie In 1900. The Camera She Is Holding Cost $1

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Studying history also gives us context for the human experience, MOOC explains. Without knowing that there have been global pandemics throughout history, such as the flu pandemic during 1918-1919, we might have had no way of knowing whether or not the COVID-19 pandemic would wipe out the entire population. It would be terrifying to experience something like that without any knowledge of people living through a similar situation in the past. But thankfully, we have historical records. We know that this has happened before, and although the COVID-19 pandemic has been a tragic and frightening situation, we can find comfort knowing that other humans have been through this before. Many of them survived and learned from it, and now we will be even more prepared the next time a pandemic occurs.  

#13 This Mirror Portrait Was Taken 100 Years Ago In Japan

Image credits: Historyfeels

#14 A Statue In Istanbul To Honor Tombili, A Famous Stray Cat. Tombili Would Sit In This Position And Watch People Pass By

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#15 Self-Defense Glove For Ladies. London, 1850

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If you’re interested in learning more about history, you’re lucky we live in such a technologically advanced time. Nowadays, we can research anything we want just by hopping onto the internet. And the more historical events we know about, the more we can think critically about the world’s past and how all of these occurrences tie together. MOOC notes that learning history is not simply about memorizing facts and dates, it’s about understanding why things happened. “Take the fall of Rome, for example. In the Roman Empire’s last years, the central government was unstable yet the empire continued to spend money on expansion,” MOOC notes.

#16 Soba Noodle Delivery In Tokyo, 1935

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#17 Marilyn Monroe Visiting Injured Troops In Japan In 1954. Unfortunately For This Soldier, He Had A Broken Back And Had To Heal Facedown

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#18 In 2010, A Family Discovered A Hidden Ancient Chappel Under Their House In Shropshire, England

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“Outside groups like the Huns and Saxons capitalized on that instability and invaded,” MOOC continues. “The empire had split into East and West, further breaking down a sense of unity, and Christianity was replacing the Roman polytheistic religion. When you become a student of history, you learn how to process facts like these and consider how one event affected the other. An expanding empire is harder to control, and invasions further tax resources. But what caused that instability in the first place? And why did expansion remain so important? Once you learn how to think this way and ask these kinds of questions, you start engaging more actively with the world around you.”

#19 Mt. Rushmore Unpresidented, 1905

Image credits: Historyfeels

#20 Blackfoot Native Americans Looking Out Over Glacier National Park In Montana

Reed was part of an early 20th century school of photographers (along with his better known contemporary Edward Curtis) of Native Americans known as ‘Pictorialists’. Their passion was to show the lives and culture of Native Americans which was ‘gradually vanishing’. Reed lived with and photographed the Ojibwe in Minnesota; the Blackfoot, Piegan, Flathead, Cheyenne, and Blood in northern Montana and southern Canada; and the Navajo and Hopi in Arizona

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#21 Oldest Door Still In Use In Rome, At The Pantheon

Cast in bronze for emperor Hadrian’s rebuilding, it dates to about 115 AD. Each door is solid bronze 2.3 m wide & 7.5 m high, yet so well balanced they can be pushed or pulled open easily by one person

Image credits: Historyfeels

One interesting benefit of understanding history that you might not have considered is that it can protect people from falling prey to conspiracy theories. The Important Site notes that conspiracy theories tend to spread much more rapidly during times of stress or chaos. But when you actually understand historical context and what is causing major changes in the world, you will know that there is not some big conspiracy behind it all. Conspiracy theories can not only be untrue, but they can also be dangerous, as they sometimes lead to real-world violence. If you have a firm understanding of history, you won’t be susceptible to falling down a YouTube rabbit hole and claiming that the world is flat or that vaccines are evil… 

#22 This Is How The Head Of A Spear Went Through A Bone During The Roman Gallic Wars. It Still Remains In The Bone After 2070 Years

Image credits: Historyfeels

#23 An Open Air School In 1957, Netherlands

 In the beginning of the 20th century a movement towards open air schools took place in Europe with classes taught in nature, so that students would benefit physically and mentally from clean air and sunlight.

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#24 Where The Great Wall Of China Meets The Sea

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Although the internet is a treasure trove of information, one thing to be aware of when researching history online is the fact that it can be manipulated to fit an agenda. There are many things that certain groups would prefer not to remember,” the Important Site notes. “We can see this happening in places like the United States, where teaching about slavery and race has been controversial for decades. History textbooks contain multiple errors, omissions, or interpretations that downplay slavery. Recently, many states are passing laws that ban critical race theory in schools, but the definition isn’t clear and could lead to teachers being penalized for simply teaching about race. History is at the center of this culture war.” Be sure to get your information from reliable sources, and check your facts. 

#25 The O’halloran Sisters, Armed With Poles And Boiling Water, Fended Off The Officers Evicting Their Family During The Irish Land War, 1889

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#26 A ‘Knocker-Up’ In London (1929). Before Alarm Clocks, People Were Paid To Wake Up Clients For Work By Knocking On Their Doors And Windows With A Stick

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#27 The Swedish Warship Vasa. It Sank In 1628 Less Than A Mile Into Its Maiden Voyage And Was Recovered From The Sea Floor After 333 Years

 Now housed at the Vasa Museum in Stockholm, is the world’s best preserved 17th century ship

Image credits: Historyfeels

Have you learned anything from this list that would make your former history teachers proud? We hope you’re enjoying viewing these captivating photos and that you’ve been reminded that there’s nothing wrong with looking back every now and then. In fact, it can be incredibly entertaining and informative to learn about history! Keep upvoting your favorite pics, and if you’d like check out another Bored Panda article featuring historical photos after you’re finished here, we recommend reading this article next. 

#28 Royal Portuguese Reading Room, Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. It Opened To The Public In 1883

Image credits: Historyfeels

#29 The Ishtar Gate, Built By The Babylonian King Nebuchadnezzar II In Mesopotamia In 575 Bc

It was finished in glazed bricks mostly in blue and it was part of a grand walled processional way leading into the city. It’s now preserved in the Pergamon Museum, Berlin.

Image credits: Historyfeels

#30 A Room From The Excavated Ruins Of Herculaneum – Destroyed During The Eruption Of Mount Vesuvius In 79 A.d

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#31 Qaṣr Al-Farīd Meaning ‘The Lonely Castle’ Is The Largest Rock-Cut Tomb At The Archaeological Site Of Hegra, In Saudi Arabia. Nabataean Kingdom, 1st Century Ce

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#32 A Boy Stares At A TV Screen For The First Time, 1948

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#33 Lady And Her Horse On A Snowy Day In 1899

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#34 High-Rise Installer On One Of The Largest Bridges In The World, The Harbour Bridge, Sydney, 1971. The Installer’s Name Is Paul Hogan, In 15 Years He Will Be Known As “Crocodile” Dundee

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#35 The Inside Of A 1926 Rolls-Royce

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#36 Japanese Archers, Circa 1860

They are practicing Kyudo, a form of archery that has been practiced for over 2,000 years in Japan. Kyudo is an extremely slow martial art done deliberately and with no wasted movement. The thought is that total immersion of the task at hand can clear the mind. A Kyudo practitioner is expected to show courtesy, compassion and morality at all times, maintaining composure and grace under pressure.

Colorized photo of course

Image credits: Historyfeels

#37 The Herculaneum Papyri Are More Than 1800 Papyri That Were Carbonized By The Eruption Of Mount Vesuvius (79 Ce)

constituting the only surviving library from antiquity that exists in its entirety. Now using new x-ray technique, these scrolls are being read for the first time in millennia

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#38 Maybe The Smartest People Ever Assembled In One Photo. Seventeen Of Them Are Nobel Prize Winners

Einstein is in the middle and Marie Curie two seats to the left. She won prizes in two separate scientific disciplines – still the only person have done so – 5th Solvay Conference on Quantum Mechanics, 1927. Photo was originally black and white and has been colorized

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#39 Siberian Unicorn, ‘Elasmotherium’, Which Went Extinct 29,000 Years Ago

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#40 Hanako Was A Koi Fish Who Died At The Age Of 226

In 1966, two of her scales were removed and extensively studied to determine her age. She was the longest living koi fish (circa 1751 – 7 July 1977)

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#41 Hanging Out In A University Of Illinois Dorm Room, 1910

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#42 The “Hasanlu Lovers” Died Around 800 B.c. And Were Discovered In 1972. They Died In What Seems To Be An Embrace Or Kiss, And Remained That Way For 2800 Years

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#43 Balloon View Of Boston, 1860. It Is The Oldest Surviving Aerial Photograph

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#44 Nobuo Fujita, A Japanese Pilot, Was The Only Person To Ever Bomb The Contiguous Us. After The War, He Was Invited Back To The Same Town He Bombed (Brookings, Oregon)

Once there, Fujita offered his family’s katana to the mayor, as a token of remorse and humility.

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Hours before sunrise off the coast of Oregon in September of 1942, there was movement on a submarine. It was nine months after the attack on Pearl Harbor and a team of Japanese sailors were quickly assembling a seaplane on the deck.

Next to them was a catapult for takeoff and a crane to pick the wheel-less plane from the sea after the mission – they were going to bomb the coast as retaliation for what was known as the ‘Doolittle raids’ which had struck Tokyo months prior.

30 year-old fighter pilot Nobuo Fujita had wanted to bomb LA or San Francisco – but had been told by his superiors to target Brookings, Oregon.

Fujita would ignite the forest, engulfing a chain of towns, drawing valuable resources away from battle and inciting fear throughout the West Coast.

But Oregon conditions wouldn’t allow it. It was wet and the bombs fizzled in the damp woods.

The crew packed away the plane and headed back West.

20 years later, a group of Brookings businessmen invited Fujita back for the towns’ Memorial Day celebrations.

When Fujita arrived, he gifted his families prized 400-year-old samurai sword to the town.

Brookings and Fujita forged a bond that lasted the next 3 decades. The town made him an honorary citizen in 1997. He passed away just days later at 85 years old.

A tree had been planted in the place where Fujita dropped the bombs, his daughter spread his ashes at the location. She said she felt his soul would be flying over the forest forever.

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#45 Rare View Of The Statue Of Liberty From The Balcony On Its Torch. That Entrance Has Been Closed Since 1916

The event that sparked the ban occurred 104 years ago, on July 30, 1916.

An explosion on Black Tom Island in New York Harbor in the middle of the night could be heard from miles away, shattering glass windows in Manhattan and killing seven people.

Black Tom had been a center for the production of armaments that were being shipped to Europe to aid mainly Britain and France, both of which were fighting Germany, during World War I — though the United States was technically neutral at the time.

Shrapnel hit the nearby Statue of Liberty, closing off the arm to future visitors.

The National Park Service’s Statue of Liberty website cites the Black Tom explosion as the reason the torch is closed off, though it is unclear why, a century later, guests are still not allowed inside.

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#46 World War 1 Observation Posts Disguised As Trees

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#47 Before And After Excavation Of An Ancient Stadium In Modern Day Turkey. Abandoned For Almost 2000 Years. 1984 – Today

It’s name is the Stadium of Magnesia ad Maendrum Ancient City, located in the modern day of Aydin/Germencik, Turkey

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#48 This Is Yuri Valentinovich Knorozov, The Soviet Ethnographer Who Deciphered The Mayan Writing System, 1980

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#49 1,800 Year Old Roman Footwear. On Display At Vindolanda Fort In England

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#50 One Of The First Photos Taken Of Tutankhamun’s Tomb When It Was Opened After More Than 3,000 Years. Colorized

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#51 Plane Emerges From The Sand 72 Years After It Crashes During Wwii On A Wales Beach

In September of 1942, an American plane took off in Europe flown by Lt. Robert Elliot. At 6,000 ft the left engine gave out. Elliot decided to try and land. As he did so however the other engine stopped so he had to crash land in 2ft of water. This is the plane.

Few local people were aware of the plane at the time because beaches in the UK were closed to the public during the war. So it sat there and became covered.

Due to shifting sands, the plane has only become uncovered three times: once in the 1970s, 2007, and most recently in 2014.

The plane is a Lockheed P-38 and one of the few of its types to survive the war. The exact location of the plane remains a secret in an attempt to protect it from disturbances, though the aircraft is covered by the Protection of Military Remains Act and disturbing it carries heavy fines.

It was recently given protected status in Wales, meaning it will not be disturbed

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#52 Archeologists And Workers Pose In 1894 In Front Of The Well Preserved Statue Of Antinous (130 Bc). It Was Unearthed Near The Temple Of Apollo In The Sanctuary At Delphi, Greece

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#53 Then And Now: Machu Picchu, Peru. 1915 To 2020

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#54 Oldest Surviving Pair Of Levis Jeans, 1879. They Were Found In A Goldmine 136 Years Later

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#55 FBI Finger Print Files, 1944

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#56 ‘if You Talk Too Much, This Man May Die!’ Fort Hood, January 1943 During Ww2

From the Library of Congress.

“Every man, a poster at Camp Hood. Taking a cue from the Office of War Information (OWI) poster “If you talk too much, this man may die”,

Private Ivan A. Smith, editor of the Camp Hood Panther, Camp Hood, Texas, originated this novel method of reminding his fellow soldiers to practice discretion. Looking into the mirror at the camp”

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#57 Human Footprints From White Sands National Park, New Mexico. Dated 21,000-23,000 Years Old

A team of scientists announced the discovery of the oldest human footprints in North America in November of 2021.

These fossilized prints were made between 23,000 and 21,000 years ago along the shores of an ice age lake that once filled the Tularosa Basin in south-central New Mexico, in what is now White Sands National Park.

This finding fundamentally changes the timeline on North American human habitation – turning back the clock of human arrival in the Americas nearly an additional 10,000 years.

The team studying these ancient trackways in White Sands National Park excavated a total of 61 footprints and found they were mostly from teenagers and children. The hypothesis is that the adults were performing skilled tasks at the lake edge, while ‘fetching and carrying’ were delegated to teens, who left more imprints than adults. The small children could have also simply played, making more prints

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#58 The Queen Consort Of Mongolia, Genepil, In Mongolia

Photograph dated January 1st, 1923. She was the last queen consort and married to the Bogd Khaganate, Bogd Khan, until his death on April 17th, 1924, when the monarchy was abolished.

After the Queen Dondogdulam died in 1923, Bogd Khan did not want to remain single. Genepil was picked as the next queen among a group of girls between 18 and 20 years old selected by the King’s counsellors. She came from a family in Northern Mongolia and was married at the time, but the courtiers took no notice of this, as the marriage was in name only.

Bogd Khan was 53-years-old, almost blind, practically immobile and very sick and she was assured she would soon be allowed to return to her first husband.

She lived with Bogd for one year until his death on April 17, 1924 when the monarchy was abolished. After leaving the Mongolian court she then returned to her family. It is unknown if she went back to her first husband or ever remarried.

In 1937, Genepil was arrested along with her family given her ties to the old regime. She was executed in May, 1938, shot as part of the systematic Stalinist destruction of Mongolian culture, in which a vast amount of the population were killed, including almost all the shamans and Buddhist lamas.

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#59 1954 Camper With A Detachable Boat That Doubles As The Roof

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#60 Stone Cooking Supports Used To Grill Skewers Of Meat By Minoans In Santorini, Greece Circa 1600 Bce

The line of holes in the base supplied coals with oxygen. Many consider modern “souvlaki” street kebabs a direct descendant of this portable food system. Museum of Prehistoric Thera, Greece

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#61 Children At An Early 1900s Playground

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#62 Queen Elizabeth II And Prince Philip At The Horse Races, 1968. Philip Passed This Morning At The Age Of 99

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#63 U.S. Marine In Vietnam 1960s

This is Sgt. Ernie Delgado seen at Khe Sanh in February 1968. His M1 helmet has his short timer calendar on it showing he has nearly completed his 13 month tour. He also has D.E.A 5685, which is likely his initials followed by the last four digit’s of his service number. This has been referred to as a medevac number or a meat tag by some veterans.

He also has the slogan “Can you dig it” and his blood type. Delgado served with 3rd Battalion, 26th Marines and completed his service in May 1968.

This photo of Delgado ran in Life Magazine that same year

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#64 Star Wars Cast Out Of Costumes

Harrison Ford (Han Solo), David Prowse (Darth Vader), Peter Mayhew (Chewbacca), Carrie Fisher (Princess Leia), Mark Hamill (Luke Skywalker) and Kenny Baker (R2-D2). circa 1977

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#65 2000 Year-Old Roman Mosaic In Zeugma, Turkey

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#66 ‘varna Man’ And The Wealthiest Grave Of The 5th Millenium B.c. Found In Bulgaria

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#67 Meeting Of Ainu People. Indigenous People From Northern Japan. Circa. 1900

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#68 Farmers “Arrest” The Sheriff Who Was Attempting To Evict A Woman From Her Farm On Behalf Of An Insurance Company. Michigan, 1952

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#69 Abandoned Moorehall, House And Estate, Built 1795 In Mayo, Ireland. It Burnt Down 1923 During The Irish Civil War And Has Been Abandoned Ever Since

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#70 Theodore Roosevelt’s Only Diary Entry On Valentine’s Day Of 1884, On The Day Both His Wife Alice And His Mother Martha Died, Just Hours After Each Other

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#71 Roman Coliseum, 1860

The cylinder structure you see was a fountain called the Meta Sudans. It was a large monumental fountain in ancient Rome, built some time between 89 and 96, under the Flavian Emperors (this would’ve been under Domitian specifically).

It was built between the Colosseum and the Temple of Venus and Roma, close to the later Arch of Constantine.

As it already appears as a ruin in this photo, the fountain was obviously damaged in the Middle Ages. The ruins of Meta Sudans survived until the 20th century. In 1936 Benito Mussolini had its remains destroyed and paved over to make room for the new traffic circle around the Colosseum.

Although the above-ground structure is gone, its foundations were later re-excavated, revealing the extensive substructure. After another excavation in 1997-98 the traffic circle was closed and the area became a pedestrian district.

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#72 Elvis Presley At The International Hotel In Las Vegas, 1969

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#73 An Ottoman Supply Train, Still Resting Where It Was Ambushed By Lawrence Of Arabia 104 Years Ago

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#74 Last Known Photo Taken Of ‘Titanic’ Before Its Sinking, 1912

There are several photos believed to be the last of ‘Titanic’. The most popular one is shoreline photograph of a four-stack vessel that has often been represented as the last ever picture of Captain E.J. Smith’s final and fatal command but in fact is not of Titanic but of Titanic’s sister ship, ‘Olympic’.

This one here, called the “Morrogh” image, is considered to be the last one ever taken.

The photo was rediscovered in 2001 and it was taken by a man named John Morrogh, who was a British Army Officer at the time. He was with his wife and brothers on an Irish hillside that day. Morrogh saw the ocean liner passing by when he setup his tripod and snapped this last known photo. Three days later the ship would famously hit an ice berg and sink to the bottom of the ocean.

The vessel you see close by? Also thought to be the last boat to pass by. Known as a small French fishing boat named Alsace, “it passed the liner on Thursday April 11, off the south-west coast of Ireland. The trawler appears to have been rather dangerously near to the Titanic, passing so close in fact that she was splashed with spray from the Titanic’s bow. The fishermen cheered the liner, and their salutations were responded to by the officer on the bridge” – The Times, 1912

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#75 A German Soldier Returns Home Only To Find His Family’s No Longer There. Frankfurt, 1946 (Photo By Tony Vaccaro)

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#76 World’s Shortest Man (“Major Mite”) And World’s Fattest Woman Circa Barnum And Bailey’s 1922

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#77 Howard Carter Opening The Sarcophagus Of King Tutankhamun, 1925

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#78 The Original Moulin Rouge, Paris, 1914

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#79 Afghan Streets, 1979

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#80 Winston Churchill Is Carried From A Nursing Home Following Being Struck By A Car In New York City

He was crossing Fifth Avenue and forgot that cars drove on the opposite side of the road from England, and failed to look to his left

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#81 American Troops In Venice, 1945

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#82 An Indian Ascetic Wearing An Iron Collar Around His Neck So That He Can Never Lie Down 1870s

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#83 Drive-In Theatre, South Bend Indiana, 1950s

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#84 The World’s Last Commercial Ocean-Going Sailing Ship – Pamir – Rounding Cape Horn, 1949

Pamir was a four-masted barque (a type of sailing vessel with three or more masts), built for the German shipping company F. Laeisz in Hamburg in 1905. She was the last commercial sailing ship to round Cape Horn, in 1949.

She was handed over to Italy in 1920 as part of war reparations (WWI).

In 1924, the F. Laeisz Company bought her back and put her into service in the nitrate trade again. Laeisz sold her in 1931 to the Finnish shipping company of Gustaf Erikson, which used her in the Australian wheat trade.

During WW2, New Zealand captured it from the Finnish corporation, as war loot basically, and didn’t return it until 1948.

The last owner was a German company that used it as a school ship and modernized it (Adding a motor and modern necessities. Though the propeller fell off during a voyage). Eventually even this failed to make the ship profitable and the company couldn’t afford to take care of the ship.

On 21 September 1957, she was caught in Hurricane Carrie and sank off the Azores.

A nine-day search for survivors was organized by the United States Coast Guard Cutter Absecon, but only four crewmen and two cadets were rescued alive, from two of the lifeboats. It was reported that many of the 86 men aboard had managed to reach the boats, but most died in the next three days.

The sinking made headlines around the world; it was a national tragedy in Germany

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#85 Roman Shipwreck Discovered In 1980 During The Maintenance Of Drainage Canal In Comacchio, Northern Italy. It Dates All The Way Back To 1 Bc

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#86 A Book Which Was Part Of The Evidence Henry Viii And His Lawyers Gathered In The 1530s To Help Win An Annulment From Catherine Of Aragon And Ultimately To Break With Rome

It was found in 2015 on the shelves of the library at Lanhydrock, a National Trust mansion in Cornwall

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#87 Russian Ghost Town

This is the village of Pegrema in the republic of Karelia, Russia. It is situated on the bank of Lake Onega. It dates back at least 500 years.

Tough to find much more then this but here is what I found in research (pieced together from multiple sources).

It was an old fishing town with about two dozen houses and a great example of the wooden architecture of days past. As hundreds and hundreds of other villages, Pegrema never received enough electricity to survive. Younger population moved and the older generation refused to change their ways. It was completely abandoned in the 1900s.

In the 1770s, a chapel was built on a little cape in front of the houses. The chapel remains almost completely intact, although all icons were removed from it after the Russian Revolution of 1917.

It is included in the list of valuable historical settlements subject to protection whose age is 500 years or more

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#88 One Of The First Glimpses Of Ernest Shackleton’s Ship ‘Endurance’, Found Last Month After 107 Years At The Bottom Of The Weddell Sea In Antarctica

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#89 Shoemaker’s Lunch, 1944. By Bernard Cole

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#90 Wrestling In The Remains Of The Basilica Of Maxentius And Constantine At The 1960 Summer Olympics Games. Rome, Italy, 1960

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#91 Aerial View Of Over 400,000 People At Woodstock, 1969

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#92 Defunct Bethlehem Steel, The Factory That Built NYC

Bethlehem Steel was, for much of the 20th century, one of the world’s largest steel producing and shipbuilding companies.

It was the provider of the steel that fueled the skyscraper boom, a massive supplier of equipment during both world wars and a icon of American industrial might.

This was their flagship plant in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, with furnaces dating as far back as 1861.

The corporation continued to thrive into the early 20th century, partly as a result of the expanding orders for guns, munitions, and naval vessels from European powers both before and during World War 1.

During WW2, Bethlehem’s 15 shipyards produces a total of 1,121 ships, more than any other builder during the war and nearly one-fifth of the U.S. Navy’s two-ocean fleet. The bulk of the company’s total employment was 300,000.

Among the buildings the company has supplied the steel for in Manhattan: the Empire State Building, World Trade Centers, Madison Square Garden, 28 Liberty Street (formerly One Chase Manhattan Plaza), Rockefeller Center, and the Waldorf Astoria.

The company went bankrupt, for a variety of reasons, in 2001.

In 1995, the original factory here closed after 140 years. The site is now home to SteelStacks, an arts and entertainment district (including a casino).

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#93 Princess Diana On A Yacht In Portofino, Italy. Summer Of 1997

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#94 A 15-Foot-Long Dugout Canoe Discovered Last Fall In Wisconsin’s Lake Mendota Has Been Scanned With High-Tech Tools And Found To Have Dated To Around 1,200 Years Ago

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#95 The White House Was Completely Gutted And Rebuilt Between 1948-1952

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#96 A 900-Year-Old Crusader Sword Was Discovered By An Israeli Scuba Diver Off The Haifa Coast

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#97 Egyptian Men Watch As The Graf Zeppelin Floats Over The Great Pyramids Of Giza, Egypt, While Sitting Atop The Great Pyramid. 1931

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#98 The Faces Of New 19 Year Old Parents (Maine, 1959)

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#99 Princess Diana’s Iconic ‘Revenge’ Dress, Worn The Night Prince Charles Publicly Admitted To Being Unfaithful To Her, 1994

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#100 Then And Now. Battle Of The Bulge. 1945-2021

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#101 The Only Known Photo Of Abraham Lincoln In His Coffin. It Was Lost At One Point For Over 90 Years

In April 1865, Abraham Lincoln‘s funeral train left Washington, D.C., on a three-week journey on its way to Springfield, Illinois.

Mary Lincoln had decreed that no photographs were to be taken of his body during the funeral procession.

But there was one exception.

A New York photographer had secretly been given permission to take photographs by Brig. Gen. E.D. Townsend, who was attending the viewing, and in charge of Lincoln’s funeral train.

Just before the doors opened to the public, photographer Jeremiah Gurney Jr. was allowed to come in and set up his equipment to take a daguerreotype photo of the solemn moment as Lincolns body lay in the rotunda of New York’s City Hall, viewed by 120,000.

Secretary of War Edwin Stanton found out and ordered all plates and prints destroyed immediately. But even he could not bring himself to do so to the last one.

He buried the photo deep in his files and it was lost to history for almost 90 years.

In 1952 a 14 year old boy was visiting the Lincoln Home historic site in Springfield, Illinois. He was looking through some old folders when he came across the faded brown photograph, which after careful research, was deemed to be authentic by experts.

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#102 Welsh Royal Guard Falling Down Due To The Extreme Heat, None Of The Others Rescued Him To Not Break Their Rules, 1957

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#103 Town Of Rysstad, Norway, 1888 – 2013

Not much I could find on this small town but the white, wooden, octagonal church was built in 1838 by Anders Thorsen Syrtveit using plans by the famous Norwegian architect Hans Linstow, who built the Royal Palace in Oslo. The church seats around 200 people.

The town dates back to the Middle Ages and was once a municipality of Norway. Population today of around one thousand.

Seen in an ‘ The Atlantic’ article which details “Tilbakeblikk”, the name of a joint project between the Norwegian Forest and Landscape Institute and Norsk Folkemuseum. Tilbakeblikk means “retrospect” or “looking back” in Norwegian, describing the project’s use of photographs taken of the same places separated by long periods of time to illustrate landscape changes in Norway

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#104 Harry S. Truman As A Captain During Wwi, 1918

Long before serving as the 33rd President of the United States, Harry S Truman served his country on the front lines of World War I.

When the U.S. entered the war in April of 1917, Truman reenlisted in the National Guard of Missouri. The decision was not a simple one.

At 33 he was older than most soldiers, and as a farmer he was not required to serve. His sister and mother would have to manage the farm without him, and quitting his oil business meant sacrificing potential riches. Worst, though, his marriage to his future wife Bess would have to be postponed. Nevertheless, he felt compelled and joined his friends in serving his country.

It was in France that Captain Truman led an artillery unit. They were all new recruits. He was short, wore thick glasses and always kept his appearance very neat and clean. This caused his men to write him off as prissy and a bit soft, an impression which would not last long.

Truman made the noncommissioned officers accountable for discipline and promised to back them up, which he proved time and again. Under Truman’s command in France, his battery did not lose a single man in combat. His men often attributed their luck to the leadership of “Captain Harry”

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#105 The Cockpit Charles Lindbergh Sat In While Piloting The First Aircraft To Make A Solo Non-Stop Transatlantic Flight, The Spirit Of Saint Louis, In May Of 1927

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#106 Last Photo Shoot Of Diana, Princess Of Wales, 1997

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#107 American High School Basketball Player Shooting A Free Throw In 1921

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#108 The Kennedy Family Children, 1928

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Source: boredpanda.com

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