Lindsey Adelman’s Ethereal Oil Lamps Illuminate TIWA Gallery

Lindsey Adelman’s Ethereal Oil Lamps Illuminate TIWA Gallery

What a sight to behold when walking into a space only to be met by flames seemingly floating midair. Titled A Realm of Light, the space in question is TriBeCa’s TIWA Gallery, and the flames, oil lamps encased in glass and suspended with darkened brass chains conceived of by none other than Lindsey Adelman, The constellation of handcrafted amber luminaries, brought to life by longtime glassblowing collaborator Michiko Sakano, are framed by hand-stitched hanging panels created by textile artist Sarah Nsikak.

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A single oil lamp on display at TIWA Gallery, designed by Lindsey Adelman

The lamps hang at varying heights and are displayed in four configurations: single, double, triple, and an eight-lamp chandelier. Their open flames and swinging nature introduce an element of unpredictability. Opposite, five amber lamps with flat bases are designed to rest on surfaces. Another set of sitting lamps, featuring sculptural glass shapes on unglazed ceramic bases, are displayed on tables and floors. These pieces, created by glass artist Nancy Callan in collaboration with Adelman, use black, clear, and gold-leaf covered glass. Some incorporate Callan’s Venetian glassblowing techniques to create unique textures and reflective finishes.

on display at TIWA Gallery, designed by Lindsey Adelman

A series of hanging oil lamps on display at TIWA Gallery, designed by Lindsey Adelman

“This collection has allowed me to reflect on the building blocks of light, why I’m drawn to working with light, why I’m a lighting designer,” Adelman explains of her relationship with light. “Fire light is my favorite kind of light. It is primal, raw, and constantly changing, and the space it illuminates is constantly changing too. It feels a bit radical as a lighting designer to just use fire, to completely sidestep or escape the rules of the cord and the plug and the UL listing,” she continues. “Sculpting with fire is completely different from designing for electricity: fire is magical and dangerous, beyond your control, and yet demanding of your complete attention.”

Lighting these oil lamps is a deliberate, hands-on act that invites users into a moment of reflection or communal gathering. This contrasts with the instant convenience of a light switch, demanding attention and creating a thoughtful atmosphere. Adelman believes in the transformative power of these small objects, which she sees as instruments of intentionality and order. Her exploration of primordial lighting forms is influenced by the history of sacred ceremonies and collective rituals, which she believes can lead to a deeper, more mystical inner world.

A single oil lamp on display at TIWA Gallery, designed by Lindsey Adelman

A single oil lamp on display at TIWA Gallery, designed by Lindsey Adelman

A single oil lamp on display at TIWA Gallery, designed by Lindsey Adelman

To learn more about this showcase visit tiwa-select.com, or to see the rest of Lindsey Adelman’s portfolio visit lindseyadelman.com.

Photography Brian Ferry.

Source: design-milk

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