Over 1M People Follow This Page To Get Their Daily Dose Of History Facts And Here Are 62 Of Them

History is sometimes labeled as boring, reminding people of school days spent memorizing endless dates and reading through textbooks. But what if it could be genuinely exciting?

There’s an Instagram account called ‘How History Looks’ that proves it can. With over 1 million followers, this page shares fascinating photos and intriguing facts from the past. Curious to see what George Washington’s teeth looked like, what you could order from an old McDonald’s menu, or how students lived in an early 20th-century dorm? Look no further: these pics and more are waiting for you below.

Listen beautiful relax classics on our Youtube channel.

#1

Image credits: instagram

If history can indeed be interesting, why is it not commonly treated as such? Experts believe the issue lies in how it’s taught—mainly through textbooks. In his book Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong, sociologist and historian James W. Loewen explains why they fail to capture our imagination:

“The stories that history textbooks tell are all predictable; every problem has already been solved or is about to be solved,” he writes. “Textbooks exclude conflict or real suspense. They leave out anything that might reflect badly upon our national character. When they try for drama, they achieve only melodrama, because readers know that everything will turn out fine in the end.”

#2

Image credits: instagram

#3

Image credits: instagram

“Textbooks also keep students in the dark about the nature of history. History is furious debate informed by evidence and reason. Textbooks encourage students to believe that history is facts to be learned,” Loewen adds.

Studying it this way meets a certain need—“a need that should not exist”—to simply absorb information in order to pass standardized tests. “It is the need for teachers who are not, first and foremost, teachers of history or social studies,” Loewen says.

#4

Image credits: instagram

#5

Image credits: instagram

David Cutler, a teacher of history and journalism at Brimmer and May in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, calls textbooks intimidating. They’re typically massive, around 1,000 pages long. “With so much dense, mind-numbing text, too many students give up trying to understand what’s really important,” he says.

#6

Image credits: instagram

#7

Listen beautiful relax classics on our Youtube channel.

Image credits: instagram

#8

Image credits: instagram

“None of the facts is remembered, because they are presented simply as one damn thing after another,” Loewen notes. He drives the point with a simple metaphor, “While textbook authors tend to include most of the trees and all too many twigs, they neglect to give readers even a glimpse of what they might find memorable: the forests”.

#9

Image credits: instagram

#10

Image credits: instagram

#11

Image credits: instagram

History truly comes alive when it feels tangible and allows you to make your own conclusions instead of blindly following someone else’s retelling of events. Photos, records, speeches, songs, even old newspapers, diaries, and letters—these are all ways to connect with the past in a personal and thought-provoking way.

#12

Image credits: instagram

#13

Image credits: instagram

#14

Image credits: instagram

Kyle Blackmer, a humanities teacher at The Heights School, shows how just a few photos can turn history into an immersive experience. For example, when teaching about the American Civil War, he lines up portraits of generals and asks students to describe their personalities based on their appearance.

“Seeing the proud, manicured, Napoleonic McClellan, the melancholic, humble Grant, and the anxious, intense Sherman all side by side is a great primer for studying the differences in leadership between these three and sets up a deeper look at their actions in the war,” he explains.

#15

Image credits: instagram

#16

Image credits: instagram

#17

Image credits: instagram

Truth is, it’s natural for humans to be curious about the past. We have an innate drive to explore what came before us, something that 16th century British antiquarian William Camden described as a “back-looking curiositie”. Psychologists refer to this as epistemic curiosity—a thirst for knowledge that motivates us to discover new ideas and learn.

#18

Image credits: instagram

#19

Image credits: instagram

#20

Image credits: instagram

So when people have the opportunity to engage with history in an enjoyable way, their enthusiasm shines through. According to a survey by Conner Prairie, 91% of Americans are eager to visit history museums that promise to spark their curiosity and offer fun ways to learn. Moreover, 89% are interested in museums that help them feel more connected to the past, giving them insights into both today’s world and the future.

#21

Image credits: instagram

#22

Image credits: instagram

#23

Image credits: instagram

Besides, research by Reach Advisors shows that history museums are considered the most trusted source of information in America. People crave authenticity, and museums, with their commitment to research and preservation, deliver a level of credibility that other sources can’t match.

#24

Image credits: instagram

#25

Image credits: instagram

#26

Image credits: instagram

The desire to learn and stay informed about the past is strong; it just needs the right motivation. And we hope these posts offered a glimpse into a more exciting way to explore history. So, ditch the textbooks and embrace your curiosity!

#27

Image credits: instagram

#28

Image credits: instagram

#29

Image credits: instagram

#30

Image credits: instagram

#31

Image credits: instagram

#32

Image credits: instagram

#33

Image credits: instagram

#34

Image credits: instagram

#35

Image credits: instagram

#36

Image credits: instagram

#37

Image credits: instagram

#38

Image credits: instagram

#39

Image credits: instagram

#40

Image credits: instagram

#41

Image credits: instagram

#42

Image credits: instagram

#43

U.S. Marine 1st Lt. Hart H. Spiegal tries to communicate with two very young Japanese soldiers captured during the Battle of Okinawa, June 17, 1945.

Image credits: instagram

#44

Image credits: instagram

#45

Image credits: instagram

#46

Image credits: instagram

#47

Image credits: instagram

#48

Image credits: instagram

#49

Image credits: instagram

#50

Image credits: instagram

#51

Image credits: instagram

#52

Image credits: instagram

#53

Image credits: instagram

#54

Image credits: instagram

#55

Image credits: instagram

#56

Image credits: instagram

#57

Image credits: instagram

#58

Image credits: instagram

#59

Image credits: instagram

#60

Image credits: instagram

#61

Image credits: instagram

#62

Image credits: instagram

Source: boredpanda.com

No votes yet.
Please wait...
Loading...