The NAGORI Planter Collection Finds Life in Fleeting Moments

The NAGORI Planter Collection Finds Life in Fleeting Moments

The Japanese concept of ‘nagori,’ defined as the essence of fleeting moments, is at the core of the NAGORI collection first introduced at Milan Design Week 2024. An embrace of this concept drives Studio KO, who designed the series of planters for pottery manufacturer Domani, with a curiosity for how time is perceived – linear or cyclical – and what it leaves behind. NAGORI tracks time allowing for past seasons to linger, from bud to bloom, through the renewing circle of nature.

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Large plant in ceramic pot placed in front of a sunlit, earth-toned wall with textured walls and shadows.

It’s an intentional cornerstone of Studio KO’s philosophy, according to founders Karl Fournier and Olivier Marty. “Influenced by the dual aspects of time, our works seek to express this delicate equilibrium, engaging with both the circular and the linear,” they share. “In the NAGORI collection, we invite the observer to reflect on the beauty of moments passing and the continuity of life.”

Large plant in ceramic pot placed in front of a sunlit, earth-toned wall with textured walls and shadows.

The planters express the sentiment through their innate simplicity and an unspoken hope to inspire convergence within the living world, a place where vitality rules. However, a flourishing life comes with both growth and decay – the inevitable touch of nature. It’s this so-called “imperfect” quality that NAGORI embraces, its own material pulled directly from the earth. The end result is raw – a reverence for the natural world and small moments captured in time. The vessel is available in three sizes and four colors from deep, fertile browns to softer shades of sun-bleached soil.

Large plant in ceramic pot placed in front of a sunlit, earth-toned wall with textured walls and shadows.

It’s also worth mentioning the striking location of this photoshoot for the collection, Villa D. Located in Marrakesh, Morocco, against sweeping skies and a backdrop of the Atlas Mountains, it’s Studio KO’s tribute to nature and architecture working as one in the form of a dwelling. Like NAGORI, Villa D is made using its own soil, adobe built up through the rammed earth technique. Both the planters and the dwelling represent a return to the basics that tell a story from the same source – man and the passage of time.

Large plant in ceramic pot placed in front of a sunlit, earth-toned wall with textured walls and shadows.

Large plant in ceramic pot placed in front of a sunlit, earth-toned wall with textured walls and shadows.

Two large plants in ceramic pots placed in a sunlit, earth-toned corridor with textured walls and shadows.

Detail of ceramic pot.

A wooden door on a textured adobe wall with two potted cactus plants under the angled shadow of a building.

Large plant in ceramic pot placed in front of a sunlit, earth-toned wall with textured walls and shadows.

Large plant in ceramic pot placed in front of a sunlit, earth-toned wall with textured walls and shadows.

Two large placed in a sunlit, earth-toned corridor with textured walls and shadows.

Large plant in ceramic pot placed in front of a sunlit, earth-toned wall with textured walls and shadows.

Large plant in ceramic pot placed in front of a sunlit, earth-toned wall with textured walls and shadows.

Detail of ceramic pot.

To learn more about the NAGORI collection of planters, visit domani.be.

Listen beautiful relax classics on our Youtube channel.

Source: design-milk

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