Winners Of The 2019 Astronomy Photographer Of The Year Have Been Announced, Here Are 139 Of The Best Ones

Astrophotography is probably one of the most difficult and specialized types of photography to try your hand at, but if you manage to get it right the rewards are some of the most astonishingly breathtaking images you are ever likely to see.

The Royal Observatory Greenwich has just revealed the winners of its annual Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition, and the quality of the entrants was nothing short of spectacular. This year the competition attracted 4,602 entries from 90 different countries across the world, all presenting the universe in a new light and vying for the coveted prize of best picture.

Hungarian photographer László Francsics was named the overall winner of Insight Investment Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2019. His bewitching image, ‘Into the Shadow’, depicts the 35 phases of the total lunar eclipse that occurred on 21 January 2019.

“For a single multiple-exposure image to capture this event with such positional precision, creative innovation and beauty is nothing short of masterful, Ed Robinson, award-winning photographer, director, creative director and founder of OneRedEye Visual Communications said about the winning image. “The colors of our atmosphere projected onto the Moon’s disc during the eclipse are not only artistically pleasing, but also offer an understanding of such events and can reveal aspects of our own, thin, yet essential atmosphere. In a year that celebrates 50 years since the first lunar landings, is it fitting that this year’s overall winning image captures such a dynamic and captivating view of the Moon.”

“A worthy winner indeed.”

Scroll down below to see the best of the entrants from this year’s competition for yourself, and let us know what you think in the comments!

#1 Our Sun Winner: ‘A Little Fireworks’ By Alan Friedman

This image presents a view of the Sun infrequently seen. It reminds me of images viewed through a microscope rather than a telescope. Taking something as huge as our star and presenting it in such fine detail as if observed under the microscope is a real feat of photography.

Oana Sandu, Community Coordinator and Communication Strategy Officer at the European Southern Observatory (ESO)

The use of a different colour palette to our expectations gives us an alternative way to think about the Sun.

Alan Sparrow, Chair of the UK Picture Editors’ Guild and Director of the UK Picture Editors’ Guild Awards

Image credits: Alan Friedman

#2 Stars And Nebulae: ‘Ngc 6164, The Blue Doily’ By Josep Drudis

Image credits: Josep Drudis

#3 Stars And Nebulae: ‘Depth And Height, Ngc 7822 Devil’s Head Nebulae Complex’ By László Bagi

Image credits: László Bagi

#4 Our Sun Runner-Up: ‘The Active Area Ar12714’ By Gabriel Corban

This is an incredible portrait of the Sun’s untameable fury – a maelstrom of seething plasma we so seldom consider as we bask in its warm rays on a peaceful day.

Tom Kerss, Public Astronomy Officer at the Royal Observatory Greenwich

Image credits: Gabriel Corban

#5 People And Space Winner: ‘Ben, Floyd & The Core’ By Ben Bush

Cloud cover doesn’t always scupper astronomy. It can complement and frame the sense of awe so long as it keeps in the right place, as captured here.

Jon Culshaw, comedian, impersonator and regular guest on The Sky at Night

Talk about a ’decisive moment!’ Vast yet intimate, breathtaking and touching all in one beautiful image.

Rebecca Roth, Image Coordinator and Social Media Specialist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

I love the story of how Floyd the dog was persuaded to be a part of this fantastic image.

Alan Sparrow, Chair of the UK Picture Editors’ Guild and Director of the UK Picture Editors’ Guild Awards

Image credits: Ben Bush

#6 Robotic Scope: ‘Sh2-308 Dolphin Head’ By Tian Lee

Image credits: Tian Lee

#7 Skyscapes Highly Commended: ‘Flower Power’ By Brandon Yoshizawa

Timing is everything. There is no better example of that than this image. However, even the best timing needs an expert eye to make the most of it. The perfect execution of capturing and processing here makes me feel as if I’m standing on the ground witnessing this incredible event.

Steve Marsh, Art Editor for BBC Sky at Night Magazine

Looking rather like a special effect from some imaginary spacecraft in a science-fiction story, this image shows hot exhaust from a launching rocket making contact with colder air. Though the initial plume is thin, the changes in atmospheric conditions as the rocket climbs cause the exhaust to surge dramatically outwards, creating the ‘petals’ of the flower. Under the right conditions, minute ice crystals form, reflecting and scattering light from over the horizon, injecting colour into the scene (including rainbow effects). The apparent stillness of the natural landscape and the man-made activity overhead contrast wonderfully, and are dramatically framed.

Edward Bloomer, Planetarium Astronomer at the Royal Observatory Greenwich

Image credits: Brandon Yoshizawa

#8 The Sir Patrick Moore Prize For Best Newcomer Joint: ‘The Horsehead Nebula’ By Rob Mogford

Image credits: Rob Mogford

#9 Aurorae: ‘Aurora Is A Bird’ By Alexander Stepanenko

Image credits: Alexander Stepanenko

#10 Stars And Nebulae Winner: ‘Statue Of Liberty Nebula’ By Ignacio Diaz Bobillo

This is simply exquisite! I love the pastel aquamarine and rosy hues, the delicate wisps of gas and dust, the finely drawn features of the nebula.

Melanie Vandenbrouck, Curator of Art at Royal Museums Greenwich

The choice of palette and attention to colour balance lend a fairy-tale quality to this image. Pools of light are perfectly balanced, inviting the eye to explore the abstract sculptural beauty of the nebulae. A superb result.

Tom Kerss, Public Astronomy Officer at the Royal Observatory Greenwich

Image credits: Ignacio Diaz Bobillo

#11 Stars And Nebulae Runner-Up: ‘A Horsehead Curtain Call’ By Bob Franke

It takes control to present monochrome images of such colourful objects such as this one. Even more control to produce one as perfectly processed as this of an object notorious for its imaging difficulty.

Steve Marsh, Art Editor for BBC Sky at Night Magazine

Image credits: Bob Franke

#12 Stars And Nebulae: ‘Fiery Lobster Nebula’ By Suavi Lipinski

Image credits: Suavi Lipinski

#13 Stars And Nebulae: ‘Deep In The Heart Of Mordor – Ngc 7293’ By Andrew Campbell

Image credits: Andrew Campbell

#14 Galaxies Runner-Up: ‘Hydrogen Sculptures In The Large Magellanic Cloud’ By Ignacio Diaz Bobillo

This is a fascinatingly unusual image in its texture and patterns, like endless backlit smoke rings in the corner of a celestial jazz bar. 

Jon Culshaw, comedian, impersonator and regular guest on The Sky at Night

Image credits: Ignacio Diaz Bobillo

#15 Galaxies Highly Commended: ‘Andromeda Galaxy’ By Raul Villaverde Fraile

This is a popular deep-sky target imaged to an intensely detailed degree. The bright halo around M31 really shines here. This is not easy to capture without bleaching out detail in the brighter parts of the main galaxy, but the photographer has managed to display fine dust lanes spiralling all the way into a beautifully balanced galactic core.

Steve Marsh, Art Editor for BBC Sky at Night Magazine

Image credits: Raul Villaverde Fraile

#16 People And Space Runner-Up: ‘Above The Tower’ By Sam King

Night-time mist, ancient ruins, ethereal light and the quiet expression of the human presence all make this contemplative scene remind me of the romantic landscapes of the German painter Caspar David Friedrich.

Melanie Vandenbrouck, Curator of Art at Royal Museums Greenwich

Image credits: Sam King

#17 Skyscapes Winner: ‘Across The Sky Of History’ By Wang Zheng

I was immediately struck by the surrealist quality of this image. There is a calmness about the scene but also a great strength in the twisted form of the dead tree reaching out, both towards the Milky Way and the falling meteor, making a powerful connection between the Earth, near sky and deep sky. The tonal quality and range emphasize the detail, which I can easily lose myself in for quite some time.

Mandy Bailey, Astronomy Secretary for the Royal Astronomy Society

From the movement of the trees to the streak of the meteor, there is symmetry and drama in this shot that feels like it was always there. The decision to de-saturate the image gives it an ageless feel.

Steve Marsh, Art Editor for BBC Sky at Night Magazine

Image credits: Wang Zheng

#18 Our Moon Winner And Overall Winner: ‘Into The Shadow’ By László Francsics

The total lunar eclipse of January 2018 was widely seen across Europe, Africa and the Americas. In this composite photo, the Moon is drifting into the Earth’s shadow from the right to the left. The deep red colour occurs as sunlight, having been filtered through the atmosphere, spills into our planet’s shadow. Such events were once a source of great concern to superstitious onlookers, but eclipses are both benign and predictable, and of course spectacular to witness.

Tom Kerss, astronomer at the Royal Observatory Greenwich

For a single multiple-exposure image to capture this event with such positional precision, creative innovation and beauty is nothing short of masterful. The colours of our atmosphere projected onto the Moon’s disc during the eclipse are not only artistically pleasing, but also offer an understanding of such events and can reveal aspects of our own, thin, yet essential atmosphere. In a year that celebrates 50 years since the first lunar landings, is it fitting that this year’s overall winning image captures such a dynamic and captivating view of the Moon. A worthy winner indeed.

Ed Robinson, award-winning photographer, director, creative director and founder of OneRedEye Visual Communications

Image credits: László Francsics

#19 Our Moon: ‘Hubble Space Telescope Transits Across The Moon Between Lunar X And Lunar V’ By Michael Marston

Image credits: Michael Marston

#20 Aurorae: ‘To The Flying Aurora’ By Zhijun Yan

Image credits: Zhijun Yan

#21 Stars And Nebulae Highly Commended: ‘The Elegant Elephant’s Trunk’ By Lluís Romero Ventura

An image of swathes of the universe under construction conveying a grace and beauty at vast distance, which contrasts with the cataclysms and ‘late heavy bombardments’ which are likely taking place at the heart of it.

Jon Culshaw, comedian, impersonator and regular guest on The Sky at Night

Image credits: Lluís Romero Ventura

#22 Our Sun Highly Commended: ‘The Sun – Atmospheric Detail’ By Jason Guenzel

I commend the creative and artistic choices made by the photographer in both the colour palette and the highlighting of the prominence with an enhanced atmospheric layer. The final image is spectacular. 

Ed Robinson, Award-winning photographer, creative director, visual consultant and founder of OneRedEye Visual Communications

Image credits:

#23 Planets, Comets And Asteroids Highly Commended: ‘Black Saturn’ By Martin Lewis

I’ve loved the monochrome images in this year’s competition and this view of Saturn is no exception. Capturing an image using a methane filter to reveal this type of detail is technically challenging. It gives us a very different view of Saturn and one I found fascinating to explore, wondering what caused the methane to form into such bands.

Mandy Bailey, Astronomy Secretary for the Royal Astronomical Society

Image credits: Martin Lewis

#24 Aurorae Winner: ‘The Watcher’ By Nicolai Brügger

I love the detail in the foreground. It puts a perspective on the aurora and gives a scale to this phenomenon.

Alan Sparrow, Chair of the UK Picture Editors’ Guild and Director of the UK Picture Editors’ Guild Awards

If an image is worth a thousand words, this one definitely encompasses that. The amount of elements to explore in this frame is impressive. Even more impressive is the way the elements come together in a balanced composition: the Milky Way arch above intersects with the aurora and the human presence points towards the landscape below, which puts up a light show of its own. I especially liked spotting the footprints in the snow.

Oana Sandu, Community Coordinator and Communication Strategy Officer at the European Southern Observatory

Image credits: Nicolai Brügger

#25 Stars And Nebulae: ‘The Running Man Nebula’ By Steven Mohr

Image credits: Steven Mohr

#26 Stars And Nebulae: ‘Ngc 2070 – The Tarantula Nebula’ By Thomas Klemmer

Image credits: Thomas Klemmer

#27 Our Sun: ‘Triple Green Flash’ By Juan-Carlos Munoz-Mateos

Image credits: Juan-Carlos Munoz-Mateos

#28 Our Sun: ‘Out On A Limb’ By Alastair Woodward

Image credits: Alastair Woodward

#29 Planets, Comets And Asteroids Winner: ‘Death Of Opportunity’ By Andy Casely

This is a brilliant sequence that not only communicates the all-consuming, Mars-wide scale of the dust storm, but also represents a poignant epitaph for the Opportunity rover. What incredible science it has given us. Opportunity will lie dormant for a time until a future Martian museum displays the plucky rover, alongside Beagle 2, Viking and all the others, for future settlers to observe with gratitude and amazement.

Jon Culshaw, comedian, impersonator and regular guest on the Sky at Night

Image credits: Andy Casely

#30 Skyscapes Runner-Up: ‘Galactic Lighthouse’ By Ruslan Merzlyakov

The range, balance and framing of this composition are already incredible, yet some intangible ingredient further elevates this image to dizzying heights of surreal beauty. The essence of exploration, from the terrestrial shore to the cosmic shore, with beacons of light both grounded and celestial, is utterly spellbinding.

Tom Kerss, Astronomer at the Royal Observatory Greenwich

Image credits: Ruslan Merzlyakov

#31 Skyscapes: ‘Mars Above The Keck Lasers’ By Sean Goebel

Image credits: Sean Goebel

#32 Skyscapes: ‘Worimi’ By Jay Evans

Image credits: Jay Evans

#33 The Sir Patrick Moore Prize For Best Newcomer Joint Winner: ‘Sky And Ground, Stars And Sand’ By Shuchang Dong

There is so much to enjoy about this picture: moonlight bathing the dunes in its silvery glow; the dramatic shadows seemingly sculpting the sand into cliffs and ravines; and the meeting of cosmic time and geological time.

Melanie Vandenbrouck, Curator of Art at Royal Museums Greenwich

There is great tonal range in this black-and-white image. I love all the lines combined with all the unique formations in the sand dunes.

Rebecca Roth, Image Coordinator and Social Media Specialist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland

A mesmerizing illustration of the night sky’s natural light; the dune sea promises a limitless horizon, yet the stars across the Universe outnumber its grains many times.

Tom Kerss, astronomer at the Royal Observatory Greenwich

Image credits: Shuchang Dong

#34 The Sir Patrick Moore Prize For Best Newcomer Joint: ‘The Perseid Fireball 2018’ By Zhengye Tang

Image credits: Zhengye Tang

#35 Our Moon Highly Commended: ‘Seven-Colour Feather Of The Moon’ By Yiming Li

If photography is ‘drawing with light’, here it seems to be painting with light, with each luminous brushstroke clearly delineated on the boundless canvas of the night sky. A painting that is expressionist in feel with its sense of drama and momentum.

Melanie Vandenbrouck, Curator of Art at Royal Museums Greenwich

Image credits: Yiming Li

#36 Our Moon: ‘Sunlight Versus Earthshine’ By László Francsics

Image credits: László Francsics

#37 Aurorae: ‘Aurora Outside The Tiny Cave’ By Sutie Yang

Image credits: Sutie Yang

#38 Stars And Nebulae: “Melotte 15 In Cassiopeia – The ‘Heart Of The Heart'” By Steve Milne, Barry Wilson

Image credits: Steve Milne, Barry Wilson

#39 Stars And Nebulae: ‘The Wolf Nebula: Sl-17’ By Andrew Campbell

Image credits: Andrew Campbell

#40 People And Space: ‘Human And The Nature’ By Gu Fei

Image credits: Gu Fei

#41 Skyscapes: ‘Deadvlei’ By Stefan Liebermann

Image credits: Stefan Liebermann

#42 The Sir Patrick Moore Prize For Best Newcomer Joint Winner: ‘The Jewels Of Orion’ By Ross Clark

This is an awe-inspiring photograph that really showcases the skills learnt by this talented astrophotographer. Great composition, colours, balance and drama makes this piece a jewel in itself.

Ed Robinson, award-winning photographer, director, creative director and founder of OneRedEye Visual Communications

A familiar target is made wonderfully vivid by a careful study of the most cutting-edge astrophotography methods. Even with modest equipment this photographer shows tremendous aptitude for the art form.

Tom Kerss, astronomer at the Royal Observatory Greenwich

Image credits: Ross Clark

#43 The Sir Patrick Moore Prize For Best Newcomer Joint: ‘Star Trails Above Everest’ By Shuchang-Dong

Image credits: Shuchang-Dong

#44 The Sir Patrick Moore Prize For Best Newcomer Joint: ‘Eclipsed Moon Trail And Trees Covered With Snow’ By Ximeng Deng

Image credits: Ximeng Deng

#45 Our Moon: ‘Impact Of A Meteoroid During The Total Lunar Eclipse’ By Rafael Ruiz

Image credits: Rafael Ruiz

#46 Our Moon: ‘Moon Eclipse Over Mount Etna’ By Alessia Scarso

Image credits: Alessia Scarso

#47 Our Moon: ‘Mineral Moon – Aristarchus Quadrangle’ By Alain Paillou

Image credits: Alain Paillou

#48 Stars And Nebulae: ‘Gum 12’ By Eddie Trimarchi

Image credits: Eddie Trimarchi

#49 Stars And Nebulae: ‘Galactic Artery’ By Raul Villaverde Fraile

Image credits: Raul Villaverde Fraile

#50 Stars And Nebulae: ‘Ngc 6543 – The Cat’s Eye’ By Jason Guenzel

Image credits: Jason Guenzel

#51 Our Sun: ‘Silent Spring Sun’ By Alan Friedman

Image credits: Alan Friedman

#52 Planets, Comets And Asteroids: ‘The Lord Of The Rings And His Court’ By Jordi Delpeix Borrell

Image credits: Jordi Delpeix Borrell

#53 Robotic Scope Winner: ‘Infrared Saturn’ By László Francsics

Colourful, abstract, creative and accomplished. I commend the photographer for their exploration and experimentation into colour and light to reveal a spectacular view of Saturn, one that I have never seen in this way before. An inspirational use of robotic scope and a reminder to amateurs that it’s a great and accessible tool to push your imaging, techniques and creativity further.

Ed Robinson, Award-winning photographer, creative director, visual consultant and founder of OneRedEye Visual Communications

Image credits: László Francsics

#54 Skyscapes: ‘Reflections Of Mount Hooker’ By Marc Toso

Image credits: Marc Toso

#55 The Sir Patrick Moore Prize For Best Newcomer Joint: ‘Bloodborne’ By Keijo Laitala

Image credits: Keijo Laitala

#56 Young Highly Commended: ‘Daytime Venus’ By Thea Hutchinson

Venus is very hard to image. It wobbles and shimmers so much as it is so close to the horizon. That this photographer has captured such a perfect shot here is amazing enough, but the use of IR filters shows real dedication to planetary imaging.

Steve Marsh, Art Editor for BBC Sky at Night Magazine

Image credits: Thea Hutchinson

#57 Young Highly Commended: ‘M31 Andromeda Galaxy’ By Tom Mogford

The photographer’s appreciation for the Andromeda Galaxy is obvious. This image is beautifully processed. Fine details, such as dust lanes in the larger of the two satellites, are clearly preserved, and the framing celebrates the enormous scale of the scene.

Tom Kerss, Public Astronomy Officer at the Royal Observatory Greenwich

Image credits: Tom Mogford

#58 Our Moon Runner-Up: ‘Crescent Moon During The Day’ By Rafael Ruiz

At first glance you may not realise how special this image is. Look closer and the pin-sharp detail of every single feature on the visible surface of the Moon shows that it was captured during a split second of perfectly still seeing. The photographer’s subtle processing has kept the natural colour of our daytime Moon intact.

Steve Marsh, Art Editor for BBC Sky at Night Magazine

Image credits: Rafael Ruiz

#59 Our Moon: ‘Archimedes And The Alps’ By Bud Martin Budzynski

Image credits: Bud Martin Budzynski

#60 Our Moon: ‘Ink-Spots’ By András Papp

Image credits: András Papp

#61 Stars And Nebulae: ‘Kemble’s Cascade’ By Alson Wong

Image credits: Alson Wong

#62 Stars And Nebulae: ‘A Hole In The Sky’ By André Van Her Hoeven

Image credits: André van her Hoeven

#63 Our Sun: ‘Active Region 12706 Appearing Over Eastern Solar Limb’ By Stuart Green

Image credits: Stuart Green

#64 People And Space Highly Commended: ‘Cosmic Plughole’ By James Stone

This is a portrait of patience, a skill every astrophotographer must hone to succeed. The stellar swirl has a tunnel-like character and the absence of a southern celestial polar star leaves us with an ambiguous ending. It seems to fade out into infinity.

Tom Kerss, astronomer at the Royal Observatory Greenwich

Image credits: James Stone

#65 People And Space: ‘The Plough And City Light’ By Ziyi Ye

Image credits: Ziyi Ye

#66 People And Space: ‘Desert Light’ By Jay Evans

Image credits: Jay Evans

#67 People And Space: ‘Dwarfed By Galaxies’ By Ekant Veer

Image credits: Ekant Veer

#68 Planets, Comets And Asteroids Runner-Up: ‘Jupiter Unravelled’ By Damian Peach

Really this technique is something only space agencies and large observatories usually have the capabilities to produce, so to see it done so well here is a rare treat. Also notable are the surface details on Io; covering just a minute percentage of the main image, albedo markings and tonal differences are clearly seen on its tiny disc.

Steve Marsh, Art Editor for BBC Sky at Night Magazine

Image credits: Damian Peach

#69 Robotic Scope: ‘The Carina Nebula’ By Petar Babić

Image credits: Petar Babić

#70 Robotic Scope: ‘The Horsehead And Flame Nebula’ By Connor Matherne

Image credits: Connor Matherne

#71 Skyscapes: ‘Celestial Navigator’ By Robin Stuart

Image credits: Robin Stuart

#72 Young: ‘The Cygnus Wall’ By Joseph Stafford

Image credits: Joseph Stafford

#73 Our Moon: ‘Lapislazuli Details Of The Moon 2/3’ By Ralf Burkart

Image credits: Ralf Burkart

#74 Our Moon: ‘Clavius’ By Maximilian Teodorescu

Image credits: Maximilian Teodorescu

#75 Our Moon: ‘Coming In To Land At Mare Crisium Spaceport!’ By Bud Martin Budzynski

Image credits: Bud Martin Budzynski

#76 Our Moon: ‘Halo’ By Bernt Olsen

Image credits: Bernt Olsen

#77 Our Moon: ‘A Titanium Moon’ By Miguel Claro

Image credits: Miguel Claro

#78 Aurorae Runner-Up: ‘Aurora Australis From Beerbarrel Beach’ By James Stone

I love the colours and reflections of the Aurora Australis. The parallel magnetic field lines show up well in the red aurora and seem to point up to the Magellanic Clouds, contrasting nicely with the diffuse green aurora that draws the eye back down to the foreground.

Mandy Bailey, Astronomy Secretary for the Royal Astronomical Society, and lecturer with the Open University 

Image credits: James Stone

#79 Aurorae Highly Commended: ‘The Return Of Green Lady’ By Ruslan Merzlyakov

There’s a lovely tranquil feeling in this photograph. The subtle colours of the aurora contrasted by the storm clouds and the boat brings this beautiful and unique view to life.

Rebecca Roth, Image Coordinator and Social Media Specialist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland, USA.

Image credits: Ruslan Merzlyakov

#80 Aurorae: ‘Dancing In The Goðafoss’ By Sutie Yang

Image credits: Sutie Yang

#81 Aurorae: ‘Incoming Auroae’ By Bernt Olsen

Image credits: Bernt Olsen

#82 Aurorae: ‘Aurora Like Phoenix’ By Wang Zheng

Image credits: Wang Zheng

#83 Stars And Nebulae: ‘Orion’ By Raul Villaverde Fraile

Image credits: Raul Villaverde Fraile

#84 Stars And Nebulae: ‘Omega Centauri And Ifn’ By Roberto Colombari

Image credits: Roberto Colombari

#85 Stars And Nebulae: ‘The Giant Cosmic Squid Nebula, Ou4’ By J-P Metsavainio

Image credits: J-P Metsavainio

#86 Stars And Nebulae: ‘An Ocean Of Stars’ By Thomas Henne

Image credits: Thomas Henne

#87 Galaxies Winner: ‘Shells Of Elliptical Galaxy Ngc 3923 In Hydra’ By Rolf Wahl Olsen

The delicate onion-skin structure of this elliptical galaxy has been captured beautifully and tells the story of a galactic merger rippling through space. The colourful stars and other galaxies that accompany the main galaxy add to the mesmeric nature of this stunning image.

Mandy Bailey, Astronomy Secretary for the Royal Astronomy Society

Being used to images from space-based telescopes such as the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope or ground-based images such as those of the European Southern Observatory (ESO), I often get the jaw-drop effect seeing such detailed deep-sky images coming from much smaller telescopes. This is definitely one of those cases.

Oana Sandu, Community Coordinator for the European Southern Observatory.

Image credits: Rolf Wahl Olsen

#88 Galaxies: ‘The Sculptor Galaxy’ By Bernard Miller, Martin Pugh

Image credits: Bernard Miller, Martin Pugh

#89 Galaxies: ‘Milky Way Centre’ By Péter Feltóti

Image credits: Péter Feltóti

#90 Galaxies: ‘A Pair Of Universes’ By Antonio Peña

Image credits: Antonio Peña

#91 Galaxies: ‘The Mighty 101’ By Nan Jiang, Wang Yao, Li Zhirong

Image credits: Nan Jiang, Wang Yao, Li Zhirong

#92 Galaxies: ‘M82 – The Cigar Galaxy’ By Jason Guenzel

Image credits: Jason Guenzel

#93 Our Sun: ‘Hubble Crosses The Disc Of The Sun’ By Michael Marston

Image credits: Michael Marston

#94 People And Space: ‘Albany Milkyway’ By Yifan Bai

Image credits: Yifan Bai

#95 People And Space: ‘Road To Glory’ By Nicolai Brügger

Image credits: Nicolai Brügger

#96 People And Space: ‘At The Edge Of Forever’ By William Vrbasso

Image credits: William Vrbasso

#97 Planets, Comets And Asteroids: ‘Noontime Venus’ By Martin Lewis

Image credits: Martin Lewis

#98 Planets, Comets And Asteroids: ‘Colourful Encounter’ By Gerald Rhemann

Image credits: Gerald Rhemann

#99 Robotic Scope: ‘Find The Stellar Jet’ By László Francsics

Image credits: László Francsics

#100 Skyscapes: ‘Road To The Stars’ By Rafael Schmall

Image credits: Rafael Schmall

#101 Skyscapes: ‘The Christmas Comet’ By Tommy Eliassen

Image credits: Tommy Eliassen

#102 Young Winner: ‘Stellar Flower’ By Davy Van Der Hoeven

This shot was my favourite in the category. The quality and detail of the final image are simply stunning considering the limited experience photographers in this category have. If 11-year-olds are so interested in space, and are willing to put in the time and effort to produce such images, I can only be optimistic, not just about the astronomy of the future, but science and technology in general. Well done!”

Oana Sandu, Community Coordinator and Communication Strategy Officer at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) 

It’s easy to over-brighten nebulae images without intending to. The photographer here has kept the whole field of view gentle and the contrast is perfect. The astute decision to use the Hubble palette really sets this image apart.

Steve Marsh, Art Editor for BBC Sky at Night Magazine

Image credits: Davy van der Hoeven

#103 Young: ‘Polar’ By Xiuquan Zhang

Image credits: Xiuquan Zhang

#104 Young: ‘The South Way’ By Alice Fock Hang

Image credits: Alice Fock Hang

#105 Our Moon: ‘Hyginus, Ariadaeus And Triesneker’ By Maximilian Teodorescu

Image credits: Maximilian Teodorescu

#106 Aurorae: ‘A Flash Of Colour’ By Matt Robinson

Image credits: Matt Robinson

#107 Aurorae: ‘Polar Lights’ By Grigorii Paramonov

Image credits: Grigorii Paramonov

#108 Aurorae: ‘Reflections Of Aurorae And Meteors’ By Angel Yu

Image credits: Angel Yu

#109 Stars And Nebulae: ‘Ic4603 – Colours Of Reflection’ By Eddie Trimarchi

Image credits: Eddie Trimarchi

#110 Stars And Nebulae: ‘The Stellar Gull’ By Raul Villaverde Fraile

Image credits: Raul Villaverde Fraile

#111 Stars And Nebulae: ‘Alnitak, Alnilam, Mintaka’ By Ferenc Szémár

Image credits: Ferenc Szémár

#112 Galaxies: ‘Messier 86 Group In Virgo’ By Mark Hanson

Image credits: Mark Hanson

#113 Galaxies: ‘Forgotten Beauty Messier 110 – Deep Study’ By Maciej Kapkowski

Image credits: Maciej Kapkowski

#114 Galaxies: ‘Ngc 5128/Centaurus A’ By Björn Gludau, Torsten Daiber

Image credits: Björn Gludau, Torsten Daiber

#115 Our Sun: ‘Painted Sun’ By Łukasz Sujka

Image credits: Łukasz Sujka

#116 People And Space: ‘Catching Light’ By Jason Perry

Image credits: Jason Perry

#117 People And Space: ‘The Last Of Us 2.0’ By David Ros Garcia

Image credits: David Ros Garcia

#118 People And Space: ‘First Of All’ By Alessandro Cantarelli

Image credits: Alessandro Cantarelli

#119 Planets, Comets And Asteroids: ‘Occultation Of Star By Asteroid’ By Derek Robson

Image credits: Derek Robson

#120 Planets, Comets And Asteroids: ‘Comet And Mountain’ By Kevin Palmer

Image credits: Kevin Palmer

#121 Planets, Comets And Asteroids: ‘Family Portrait: The King And His Court’ By Jordi Delpeix Borrell

Image credits: Jordi Delpeix Borrell

#122 Robotic Scope: ‘Carina Homunculus’ By Kfir Simon

Image credits: Kfir Simon

#123 Robotic Scope: ‘The Dragons Of Ara’ By Tian Lee

Image credits: Tian Lee

#124 Robotic Scope: ‘Ldn 1622 – The Boogeyman Nebula’ By Casey Good

Image credits: Casey Good

#125 Robotic Scope: ‘Mars After The Global Dust Storm’ By Dzmitry Kananovich

Image credits: Dzmitry Kananovich

#126 Robotic Scope: ‘Ngc 1365 – The Great Barred Spiral Galaxy’ By Casey Good

Image credits: Casey Good

#127 Skyscapes: ‘Alstrom Point’ By Carlos F. Turienzo

Image credits: Carlos F. Turienzo

#128 Skyscapes: ‘Sharafkhaneh Port And Lake Urmia’ By Masoud Ghadiri

Image credits: Masoud Ghadiri

#129 Skyscapes: ‘Ageless’ By Marcin Zajac

Image credits: Marcin Zajac

#130 Skyscapes: ‘The Remnants’ By Marcin Zajac

Image credits: Marcin Zajac

#131 Skyscapes: ‘Grand Finale’ By Gordon Mackie

Image credits: Gordon Mackie

#132 Skyscapes: ‘Galactic Coast’ By Luke Moseley

Image credits: Luke Moseley

#133 Skyscapes: ‘Embrace Of The Mountains, Heart Of The Universe!’ By Majid Ghohroodi

Image credits: Majid Ghohroodi

#134 Skyscapes: ‘View Point’ By Nicolai Brügger

Image credits: Nicolai Brügger

#135 The Sir Patrick Moore Prize For Best Newcomer Joint: ‘Rosette Nebula, Christmas Tree Cluster And Hydrogen Cloud Widefield’ By Ross Clark

Image credits: Ross Clark

#136 Young Runner-Up: ‘Ar12699 Sunspot’ By Matúš Motlo

Not for the faint-hearted, close-ups of our star are notoriously difficult to achieve, and this young photographer rivals the most seasoned sun chasers! This image shows a great concentration on details, texture and sharply defined sunspots.

Melanie Vandenbrouck, Curator of Art post-1800 at Royal Museums Greenwich

Image credits: Matúš Motlo

#137 Young Highly Commended: ‘Van Eyck’s Moon’ By Casper Kentish

What a delightful idea to take inspiration from astronomical images in classic art and hunt them down in reality. The fogging up of the eyepiece was great serendipity as it gives a quality to the image as if van Eyck himself had updated the original.

Jon Culshaw, comedian, impersonator and regular guest on The Sky at Night

Image credits: Casper Kentish

#138 Young: ‘Our Moon’ By Tom Mogford

Image credits: Tom Mogford

#139 Young: ‘The Sun’ By Victoria Williamson

Image credits: Victoria Williamson

Source: boredpanda.com

Rating Winners Of The 2019 Astronomy Photographer Of The Year Have Been Announced, Here Are 139 Of The Best Ones is 5.0 / 5 Votes: 5
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